Prince: Black Music’s Liberated Son

by Shane Thomas  The first thing that struck me about Prince was his voice. Not his singing voice – as marvellous as that was – but his speaking voice. It’s measured. It’s calm. Mellow without ever being monotone. You know who it reminds me of? Toni Morrison. It’s the vocal signature of someone who is totally… Read More

What fresh hell is this? ‘The Princess of North Sudan; more scary tale than fairy tale’

by Samira Sawlani Between Sudan and Egypt lies Bir Tawil, an area which is simply desert, rocks and mountain under the scorching sun. Both states neither claim nor desire Bir Tawil, preferring to focus upon their dispute over the nearby territory of Hala’ib which is situated by the Red Sea. As with many regions which… Read More

WWF, human rights abuses and the need to decolonise conservation

Recent allegations of human rights abuses by the WWF not only betray a colonial attitude to conservation abroad but also reflects attitudes to people of colour in conservation worldwide, writes Beth Collier Featured image: A Baka woman fishes in the forest near Lobéké National Park, Cameroon – Tom Warren/BuzzFeed In the latest controversy for the… Read More

Femonationalism: White saviour feminism in Afghanistan

“Western” feminists often discuss and offer solutions for the position of women in Afghanistan, however as Munazza Ebtikar writes, these viewpoints are often stripped of the context of decades of military devastation and silence the voices of Afghan women who are fighting for change Featured image – member of Aghan parliament Fawzia Koofi Cheryl Benard… Read More

Decolonial Fantasy Lands

A lifetime of being othered due to skin colour, race, religion, takes a toll on the psyche; instilling shame, inferiority, and self-loathing. This can lead people of colour, including film-makers, writers, and other artists to seek purer, more beautiful alternative worlds. However as Kavita Bhanot and Ayesha Manazir Siddiqi discuss ‘Everyone wants to imagine themselves… Read More

Why Janelle Monaé’s Grammy loss was unsurprising yet significant

Janelle Monaé’s critically acclaimed Dirty Computer lost out on Album of Year award at this year’s Grammy awards. Ayika Tshimanga revisits the album and its significance to marginalised people  At the Grammy Awards ceremony on February 10th, Janelle Monaé lost the coveted Album of the Year award to Kacey Musgraves. And so, the Recording Academy… Read More

Blackface and anti-Blackness in Bollywood – an endemic problem

In the second of his articles discussing anti-Blackness in South Asian communities, Dhruva Balram investigates Blackface and anti-Blackness in Bollywood, how these narratives drive attitudes in wider culture, and the move for change. Part one can be read here Growing up in India, alongside rice and daal, Bollywood is a part of your every day diet.… Read More

In the rush to criticise Kate Osamor, many have forgotten her humanity – a response | THE TWERKING GIRL

Following her article on Kate Osamor and the furore over her council home, Ava Vidal responds to the overwhelming number of comments she has received on social media, and asks if the outrage is proportionate. Since writing my article “Kate Osamor and the insidious and dangerous racism from the left” my Twitter mentions have been on fire.… Read More

The Top 10 Media Diversified articles of 2018

As 2018 comes to an end, we take a look back at our most-read articles this year here at Media Diversified. Some were new in 2018, others were classics from the archives enjoying a resurgence. From medicine to politics, Love Island to the history of the Congo, cleaning up to being a Duchess with the… Read More