‘A ballad of life in prose poetry’: Review of The Terrible by Yrsa Daley-Ward

Cardyn Brooks reviews The Terrible, a memoir by British poet, Yrsa Daley-Ward Read More

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Meet Caleb Femi, the Young Poet Laureate telling stories of love at the chickenshop

Heartbreak and Grime will make you shake your head in shame and/or disgust at the things women had to put up with, the bizarre façades which define teen relationships in general and the blatant misogyny that so many of us once drank unquestioningly. Read More

You cannot mention Grime and not mention Blackness, you cannot mention the art form and erase the people

by Shereen Abyan  To try to come up with a set definition of Black British culture would be difficult. The very idea of Black Britishness is relative. It relies on the intricacy of localities and waves of immigrant communities, melding into each other as they adapt to the limited institutional access given to them by the… Read More

2014 marks the 125th anniversary of the world’s first black professional footballer, so where are the black coaches?

Favouritism, discrimination and racism is preventing BME coaches from working within English professional football by Colin Joseph Last month a 16ft statue of the world’s first black professional football player – Arthur Wharton – was unveiled at the Football Association’s (FA’s) national football centre in Burton, West Midlands. The memorial statue was erected (thanks to… Read More

Black – Political vs. Ethnic?

by Nathan E Richards Next month Goldsmiths University is to host an event on black feminism, with two guests from the institution to speak on this important topic – the event is billed thusly: “Conversation on Black British Feminism”. Two of Britain’s internationally acclaimed professors of race and gender will talk about Black British feminism… Read More

“Toxic Wars” vs. Conscientious Feminism

Minna Salami draws upon cross-cultural activism and dialogue to offer ‘Conscientious Feminism’ as an antidote to ‘toxic feminism’ and an ethical ‘compass that can be used to navigate the labyrinth of oppression’ In July 1992, an international conference Women in Africa and in the African Diaspora (WAAD) was held in Nigeria. WAAD was a rare event: an interdisciplinary and… Read More

The Racial Pecking Order in British Theatre and TV

Structural Inequality In UK Theatre & TV by Daniel York I’ve been reading a book recently by the American sociologist David T. Wellman with the frankly terrifying title Portraits Of White Racism. I say terrifying because it conjures all kinds of images of Aryan skinhead fascists with big boots and arm-bands. I find myself hiding… Read More

Who Stole all the Black Women from Britain?

by Emma Dabiri There is no love left between a black man and a black woman. Take me for instance. I love white women and hate black women. It’s just in me so deep that I don’t even try to get it out of me anymore. I’d jump over ten nigger bitches just to get… Read More