Daughters of the Dust: Inspiring black story telling for a generation

By Precious Agbabiaka I remember just over a year ago being completely captivated by Beyoncé’s visual album Lemonade. The scenes belonging to the chapters “Hope” and “Redemption” from the hour long masterpiece brought me so much joy and renewed sense of pride as I bore witness to black girls and women, including some familiar faces,… Read More

Brown men belong in documentaries, not fine art: in conversation with photographer Mahtab Hussain

by Jamal Mehmood These are trying times for the subjects of Mahtab Hussain’s latest work. The artist’s series of portraits titled ‘You Get Me?’ is a timely look at young, working class South Asian men, who identify as Muslim. A community that is at once under pernicious state surveillance, as well as increasing intimidation from… Read More

Denial, shame and the Armenian Genocide

by Robert Kazandjian The identity I was constructing for myself collapsed around my L.A-Gear-clad feet when I was six or seven. My friend Kirilos arrived from Sudan, and joined our school. The teacher, encouraged by my proud declarations of Egyptian heritage, told me to speak ‘your language’ with him. ‘Parev, inch’pes es?’ (Hello, how are… Read More

How to be Desi in 2017: Riz MC and Heems are forging a new cultural reflection of South Asians in diaspora

by Iman Sultan  I don’t normally get moved by music videos, but Swet Shop Boys’ internet-released video, “Aaja”, a track off their Cashmere album, released late last year, felt like salvation A tribute to Pakistani social media star Qandeel Baloch, who was murdered last summer, and whose very death made her an icon, the video… Read More

Writing Africa in America, living between two worlds

by Samira Sawlani  Over the years I have observed the many ways in which we diaspora folk stay connected to ‘back home.’ For some it is through cooking, for others it is music and dance. There are the hours spent trawling through the websites of local newspapers and days filled with the deliciousness of Skype… Read More

You cannot mention Grime and not mention Blackness, you cannot mention the art form and erase the people

by Shereen Abyan  To try to come up with a set definition of Black British culture would be difficult. The very idea of Black Britishness is relative. It relies on the intricacy of localities and waves of immigrant communities, melding into each other as they adapt to the limited institutional access given to them by the… Read More

Politicians Must Acknowledge the Link Between Negative Media Stereotyping of the Somali Community and Marginalisation

by Faisa Abdi and Hamdi Issa What are the implications when British society as a whole strongly associate Somalis with intractable problems? Over the past decade, media reporting on the Somali community has been disproportionately negative and perpetually centred on moments of crisis. The typical captions are all too often the pirate, the benefit cheat,… Read More