Writing Africa in America, living between two worlds

by Samira Sawlani  Over the years I have observed the many ways in which we diaspora folk stay connected to ‘back home.’ For some it is through cooking, for others it is music and dance. There are the hours spent trawling through the websites of local newspapers and days filled with the deliciousness of Skype… Read More

Perhaps we really should go back to Africa

by Felipe Araujo  In Solange’s album A Seat at the Table, there is a song called “Where Do We Go”. Released in 2016, it is a poignant compilation of personal confessions and meditations on growing up black in America. “Where Do We Go”, sung in a whisper, talks about a home she no longer recognises… Read More

Apocalypse and precarity: Iranian online humor and Trump’s victory

by Sara Tafakori and Gilda Seddighi  ‘From the American people to Iranian social media users: if your expert opinions and discussions about the American election have ended, please do shut up for a moment and let us Americans work out what the heck we do now’. This tweet by a presenter of a diasporic Iranian… Read More

2016’s Racism in Review

It’s Nothing New by Shane Thomas Racism. The obvious kind. We saw plenty of it in 2016. We’re likely to see more in 2017. But we’re less likely to get a nuanced analysis of it from the thinkpiece carousel. In truth, there’s the overt racist, the anti-racist, and a whole lot in between. You can be… Read More

All politics is “identity politics”

by Maya Goodfellow  The forces of right-wing xenophobic populism are stronger in America and Europe than they have been in decades. Donald Trump is president-elect in the United States; after a virulently anti-migrant referendum campaign, the UK voted to leave the EU and far-right parties are gaining ground across much of Europe. The left – in… Read More

Chance the Preacher

by Zain Dada “When the praises go up, the blessings come down, I promise you!” This wasn’t the voice of a preacher at a gospel church in Brixton but that of 6-time Grammy-nominated Chance The Rapper at Brixton Academy on a rainy Sunday evening in November. The performance was Chicago rapper Chance’s first major gig in London, supported… Read More

We are not “belligerent,” “dark” or “bitter”

by Tele Ogunyemi Yasmin Alibhai-Brown’s recent article ‘Blend it like Britain’ is a masterpiece in how to simultaneously erase and fetishize people of colour. Published on 6th November 2016 in the Sunday Times Magazine to promote Amma Asante’s new film A United Kingdom, the article is littered with racist or otherwise problematic assertions about people… Read More

White tribalism was not made by Trump. It already existed in America as it does in Britain

by Lester Holloway ‘This was a whitelash.’ Political commentator Van Jones pulled no punches on election night as he sought to nail the reasons for Trump’s victory. ‘This was a whitelash against a changing country. It was a whitelash against a black president.’ The phrase was picked up by the chatterati, including Polly Toynbee in… Read More

Whatever the outcome of the US Election, Trumpism is here to stay

by Abdullah Shihipar In a few days Americans will head to the polls to decide who their next commander in chief will be.  Millions have already cast their ballots early in what seems like the longest presidential election in recent history. Debates have been held, punches have been thrown, epithets have been hurled and lives have… Read More