Denial, shame and the Armenian Genocide

by Robert Kazandjian The identity I was constructing for myself collapsed around my L.A-Gear-clad feet when I was six or seven. My friend Kirilos arrived from Sudan, and joined our school. The teacher, encouraged by my proud declarations of Egyptian heritage, told me to speak ‘your language’ with him. ‘Parev, inch’pes es?’ (Hello, how are… Read More

It will take more than sympathy to save refugees from drowning in lifejackets

by Shahd Abusalama As world leaders were meeting in New York for the UN Migration Summit on Monday, activists transformed Parliament Square, the doorstep of British decision makers, into a graveyard of thousands of lifejackets. These lifejackets had once been worn by refugees that made it to the European beaches. No one knows if they… Read More

Persecuted at home, Syrian women seek new beginnings in Istanbul’s “little Syria”

by Felipe Araujo In an old basement deep in the heart of the Fatih district in Istanbul, Syrian women gather around a table making jewellery. When I visited the place on a rainy Friday afternoon, the hustle and bustle of this city of 14 million suddenly disappeared, giving way to memories of Aleppo and Damascus.… Read More

How the West lies to itself in order to destroy the Other

by Mark Bou Mansour  The West is facing a growing crisis – one that is swarming its borders, bankrupting its economies, exploiting its welfare systems, undermining its values and terrorizing its streets. That crisis is the other: the refugee, the migrant, the Syrian, the Mexican, the Muslim. Or so goes the great drama of our… Read More

From Boyle to May, immigration, as it turns out, has done rather well on providing jobs

by Chimene Suleyman I don’t know how I thought my parents came to England. I suppose I assumed they flew. It didn’t occur to me that they travelled by boat. One that took them first to Italy. By then the Cyprus civil war had spanned most of their lives. My father’s father was killed; at… Read More