No More Excuses: Why “Everyone’s A Little Bit Racist” Isn’t Enough

by Maya Goodfellow “I’m not racist, but…” Most people of colour have heard this tired-out phrase before. It’s usually followed by words that are meant to comfort but actually reinforce the racism lacing the sentence preceding it. It seems that now, for the more enlightened people wanting to condemn but in the same breath excuse… Read More

Police Violence and the Discourse of (White) Fear

by Margarita Aragon Last month, police in Cleveland shot a 12-year-old boy as he played in a park. Perhaps, you have seen the CCTV footage. In the silent stilted images, Tamir Rice wanders aimlessly, pointing a BB gun in various directions, before sitting by himself on a bench. A police car speeds into view and the… Read More

Obama-ology

by Sabo Kpade Talks of an Obama biopic have been dismissed as too hasty – the cinematic equivalent of burial rites performed in anticipation of the subject’s death. One could say the same about any number of works of art with him as inspiration. Wiser to wait for when his tenure is over, when the… Read More

Do They Know New Africa At All?

by David Wood I always ask myself a couple of questions before starting this column. One is whether l can write an incisive, perceptive, eloquent yet occasionally witty piece about a contemporary issue without invoking Diane Abbott’s ‘divide and rule’ maxim and making negative observations about fellow members of our African diaspora. Apart from UKIP’s… Read More

Tourism, White Privilege and Colonial Mentality in East Africa

Two weeks ago the media reported that the Kenyan Government have offered a free holiday to the family of a 15 year old American tourist who was ‘harassed by a police officer’ because he mistook her for terror suspect Samantha Lewthwaite. If it was a Somali family holidaying in Kenya and their son had been mistaken for Abu Ubaidah the new leader of Al-Shabaab would the same courtesy have been offered? I highly doubt it.
The concept of white privilege is associated with predominantly white societies such as the United States of America and Great Britain Read More

ISIS – We’re going to war, but are we breaking the law?

by Amanda Paul Parliament has just sanctioned airstrikes on Iraqi soil after Iraq’s Prime Minister Haider Al-Abadi requested military intervention by Britain a few days ago. The cause for such a grandiose request – ISIS. ISIS needs to be STOPPED. I’m concerned though by the means Britain believes it should use to achieve this. Airstrikes… Read More

“No, I meant where are you really from?” on being black and German

by Ella Achola “No, I meant where are you really from?” is a micro-aggression I am all too familiar with when my simple answer of “Berlin” is perceived as insufficient to a query that blatantly illustrates how my brown self is read as out of reach of possible German citizenship. It is usually asked with… Read More

Teaching English in China While Black

by Ashley Evangelista In the industry of teaching English abroad, people of colour don’t exist. Or at least that’s what you might think from reading articles like Vice’s White People with No Skill Sets Wanted in China. In the piece, Walker and Hartley suggest that Chinese people believe all white people can teach English well.… Read More

The African-Argentine: Not an oxymoron

by Rachel Décoste “Liberty has no color” read the signs held outside a Buenos Aires city courthouse. However,  Argentines are famous for saying, “no hay negros en Argentina, “there are no blacks in Argentina.”  ~Trip Down Memory Lane – African Descendants In Argentina I have been fortunate to travel extensively in my adult life. There is no better… Read More

Campus Racism in Brazil – The Case of Stephanie Ribeiro

In May 2014, Stephanie Ribeiro, a scholarship student at the elite Pontifical Catholic University (PUC) in Campinas (São Paulo), wrote about her experiences of racism at the University. With the help of her supporters, including Betty Martins and Sueli Feliziani, we republish Steph’s story. Campus racism in Brazil – some context Yasmin Gunaratnam and Sueli… Read More