Is Knife Crime really a national emergency?

Is knife crime a moral panic or a social epidemic? @KojoRTE argues that instead of the current opportunistic consensus between both major parties we need a wide-ranging public discussion on the main indicators of youth violence which include household poverty, inequality and drugs policy. Knife violence is highly emotive and traumatic, whether it’s the images… Read More

White feminists’ views on Shamima Begum are a failure for all young women of colour

Reaction to the news of Shamima Begum’s loss of her son are still lacking in humanity and empathy, even from white feminists, and as Shaista Aziz writes, that has a real impact on young women of colour A young 19-year-old teenage mother born in Bethnal Green London has lost her third child in the space… Read More

Does Black music need to “get its house in order?”

A new event aims to get to the heart of music scholarship and how ever-evolving genres of Black music are researched, engaged with, and social significance discussed We find ourselves in a bizarre cultural moment, again. Black music, and specifically this digitally-mediated, largely homegrown and magnetic form which draws influence from across the diaspora, has… Read More

A never-ending affair – India, Pakistan and Kashmir

Following recent tensions between India and Pakistan, forthright opinions were expressed on both sides, by nationals and across the diaspora. But as Neha Maqsood writes, one thing was forgotten: the status of Kashmir. “It seems that these two nations, India and Pakistan, cannot seem to give the other up. And they’ll always be connected over… Read More

Majority white newsrooms are still treating BAME journalists as subordinate, second-rate assets   

There’s been much debate around the lack of diversity in journalism and how to resolve the issue. However as Lucrece Grehoua writes, what’s not so much part of the discussion is what happens to BAME journalists once they enter majority white organisations The world of journalism remains a shocking 94 per cent white according to a… Read More

Decolonial Fantasy Lands

A lifetime of being othered due to skin colour, race, religion, takes a toll on the psyche; instilling shame, inferiority, and self-loathing. This can lead people of colour, including film-makers, writers, and other artists to seek purer, more beautiful alternative worlds. However as Kavita Bhanot and Ayesha Manazir Siddiqi discuss ‘Everyone wants to imagine themselves… Read More

Comic Relief and Stacey Dooley’s responses to David Lammy betray deeper issues in the aid sector

Shaista Aziz and Alexia Pepper de Caires of NGO Safe Space discuss how Comic Relief and Stacey Dooley’s insensitive response to David Lammy’s discussion of th white savour complex in the aid sector betrays deeper issues in many NGOs What does Stacey Dooley’s insensitive Twitter invite to David Lammy MP to visit ‘Africa’ have to do with decades… Read More

Skin whitening creams – the movement for change

In the fourth of his articles discussing anti-Blackness and colourism in South Asian communities, Dhruva Balram discusses skin-whitening creams, how they link to anti-Blackness and the movement for change. Around the turn of the century, a string of controversial commercials appeared on television screens in India. The advertisements had viewers in an uproar. These commercials, which… Read More

Open Letter: The industry press body IPSO is failing to protect minorities from press discrimination

The industry press body IPSO is failing to protect minorities from press discrimination. The so-called ‘regulator’ refuses to take complaints about discriminatory language aimed at minority groups seriously  making them complicit in the hate directed at minority ethnic communities. At this point every member of every vulnerable minority knows IPSO cannot and will not protect… Read More