GLITCH: the film festival seizing space for queer people of colour

by Rosie Lewis From homophobic and state violence, to the relentless attacks of white supremacy, capitalism and patriarchy and questions of how these threats can be resolved; GLITCH is a film festival that addresses some of the most pressing issues in society. Returning to Glasgow’s Centre for Contemporary Arts (CCA) this year, it promises to showcase an… Read More

Get Out: If I’m around too many white people, I get nervous

By Maurice Mcleod  (spoilers only in the links) Good horror, just like good satire, isn’t built around the bizarre, it’s built on the familiar. There are few things more familiar to black people in the West than being the outsider in social or professional circles. Answering dumb-ass questions about your heritage or sporting prowess are just… Read More

And the winner of the inaugural Jhalak Prize is…

Today, we announce the winner of the first ever Jhalak Prize for Book of the Year by a Writer of Colour. Jacob Ross, novelist, short story writer and tutor, wins the £1000 prize with his first foray into crime fiction, The Bone Readers. The book, described by judge Musa Okwonga as ‘by turns thrilling, visceral… Read More

Art doesn’t have the privilege of looking on as everyone else struggles: London’s Bush Theatre re-opens with Black Lives, Black Words

by Zahra Dalilah When Madani Younis stepped into the role of Artistic Director of the Bush Theatre in 2012, he became the first person of colour to run a theatre building in London’s history. Under no illusions as to just how radically things were changing, Younis began laying the foundations for what in 2017 has… Read More

Some people aren’t celebrating Mahershala Ali as the first Muslim to win an Oscar: let’s talk about anti-Ahmadi discrimination

by Ayesha Mehta After years of disappointment with the Oscars disregarding diverse talent, and the growing frustration that Hollywood only tells black stories in the context of historical trauma and racist brutality, Mahershala Ali’s win for his role in a film about the contemporary experience of a young, gay, African-American was a moment brimming with significance.… Read More

Not in the family portrait: BME voters and Brexit – Part II

By Brian Alleyne Brexit, social class and ethnicity According to research done by Lord Ashcroft, people in England and Wales who were older, lived outside major cities, had lower levels of education and a lower social class position tended to vote Leave. Conversely, people in London and the larger English cities, with higher levels of… Read More

Not in the family portrait: BME voters and Brexit – Part I

Not in the family portrait: BME voters and Brexit – Part I By Brian Alleyne Martin is a Leave voter who was “unemployed … had his benefits suspended and been summonsed for non-payment of council tax. For him, the EU referendum was a chance to kick back”.  Martin’s story, as told in a June 20,… Read More

Dropping the mic in his own time: as-salamu alaykum Yasiin Bey

by Jamal Mehmood Earlier this year, the artist formerly known as Mos Def gave his farewell performances in London. Hiphop’s own whirling dervish, who dared to whirl and pray on a simply decorated stage, dropping rose petals on a floor already filled with balloons. This was the Yasiin show. There was no formal set list… Read More

How should we teach children about contested histories?

by Farah Elahi  In recent years, there have been numerous campaigns for the inclusion of marginalised histories in the national curriculum. These campaigns have been successful in retaining key black British figures such as Mary Seacole and Olaudah Equiano in history lessons. However, inclusion is not enough. We must go further, ensuring that these stories… Read More