Home truths, or Swedish for beginners

by Mara Lee The fundament of home is the community and the feeling of belonging. The good home doesn’t know of any privileged or left out people, no pets, and no stepchildren. Here, nobody looks down on one another. Nobody tries to obtain advantages at somebody else’s expense. The strong neither oppresses nor plunders the… Read More

“Playing the Race Card”: A Transatlantic Perspective

by Ahmed Olayinka Sule  What do Barack Obama, Nelson Mandela, Diane Abbott, Serena Williams and Oprah Winfrey have in common? Besides being black public figures, they have all been accused of playing, using or pulling the race card. According to Wikipedia, “Playing the race card is an idiomatic phrase that refers to exploitation of either racist… Read More

On The Other End Of A Joke – British stand-up comedy

by Anthony Anaxagorou Last November, in an interview with London Real, I spoke briefly on the subject of British stand-up comedy and my discontent with what much of it represents. When the interview was uploaded to the channel’s 82,000 subscriber network, my thoughts on the subject seemed to attract a wave of inarticulate and misjudged… Read More

Too Asian, Not Asian Enough

by Kavita Bhanot First published in Asia Literary Review Over the last two decades, in part due to the success of a small number of novels, plays, films, music albums and television shows, the term ‘British Asian’ has emerged as an identity marker associated with the cultural practices of second-generation South Asian immigrants, born and/or… Read More

Newcomer Juma Sharkan as the ‘Liberian Girl’ Soldier is a Revelation

by Sabo Kpade Liberian Girl is about a 14-year-old called Martha set during the second Liberian civil war (1999 – 2003) which brought Charles Taylor to power. To escape advancing rebels Martha and her grandma Mammie Esther flee into the bushes but are captured by members of the Small Boy’s Unit, a feeder arm of… Read More

10 Poets of Colour we Discovered (or Rediscovered) in 2014

by Samira Sawlani Never has poetry been as crucial as it is right now, to remind us, people of colour, of the importance of self love, self care and self acceptance. It has a central role in creatively articulating the many injustices in the world today, giving a human perspective to the tragedies occurring around the… Read More

Things Fall Apart; The Attempted Hijack of the Black Writer

by JJ Bola  “All art is political, Johnson. Otherwise, it would just be decoration,” said the Earl of Oxford in Shakespeare’s Richard III.* To assume that this does not extend to the great art of literature would simply be false. Unlike visual art, which can either be used to make bold political statements or balance… Read More

Police Violence and the Discourse of (White) Fear

by Margarita Aragon Last month, police in Cleveland shot a 12-year-old boy as he played in a park. Perhaps, you have seen the CCTV footage. In the silent stilted images, Tamir Rice wanders aimlessly, pointing a BB gun in various directions, before sitting by himself on a bench. A police car speeds into view and the… Read More

Writers in Translation

by Sinthujan Varatharajah A few days ago, I was sitting with a friend, we were casually chatting when I suddenly remembered that her father is a writer – as is my mother. I remembered that we somehow knew each other through our parents who again knew each other through diasporic writers’ circles. We laughed about… Read More