The bar has been set and theatre is going to have to raise its game to live up to The Royale

by Sabo Kpade   The Royale/Bush Theatre It is often proof of a show’s strength that only after it ends is one free from its power to unpick its machinations. Marco Ramizez’s Royale is one such play. Loosely based on the life of Jack Johnson and his 1910 fight against the retired undefeated champion James… Read More

On The Other End Of A Joke – British stand-up comedy

by Anthony Anaxagorou Last November, in an interview with London Real, I spoke briefly on the subject of British stand-up comedy and my discontent with what much of it represents. When the interview was uploaded to the channel’s 82,000 subscriber network, my thoughts on the subject seemed to attract a wave of inarticulate and misjudged… Read More

Prejudice, bias and convention: The problem for Equity and minority ethnic actors

by Paul Courtenay Hyu Actors, like any other profession, benefit from a trade union, which represents them in matters relating to work. The year I joined Equity, the actor’s trade union, in 1989, was the year that Miss Saigon opened in the West End and Jonathan Pryce was cast to play an East Asian part,… Read More

The Tragedy Of Otello: A layperson’s view of racial politics in 21st Century opera

 by Daniel York  The English National Opera have recently announced that the role of Otello in their upcoming production of Verdi’s opera of the same name, which is based on Shakespeare’s Othello, will be played by the renowned Australian tenor, Stuart Skelton. Othello is of course Shakespeare’s famous (and in many ways infamous) “black” character.… Read More