The politics of love in If Beale Street Could Talk

In his review of If Beale Street Could Talk, D. H. Alves demonstrates that both Barry Jenkins and James Baldwin articulate love as a political force, placing it at the centre of their work, be it in the format of the novel, or its cinematographic adaptation. He examines the theological nature of Baldwin’s work and how… Read More

The minimising of the sexual assault of Black boys

LeRon Barton discusses the sexual abuse of Black boys and how their sexual assault or rape is often seen as a “rite of passage” instead of  a discussion about victimhood and support CONTENT NOTE: This article includes frank discussion of sexual assault from the very beginning. Stock photo used. If you are affected by issues in… Read More

Porn: Our colour blind spot when it comes to racism

by Yomi Adegoke  The general consensus among left-leaning thinkers is that stereotypes, especially harmful, racist ones, are never a good thing. Especially if those stereotypes are being peddled in part for the purposes of sexual gratification and fetishisation. The exception, of course, is when they are solely for sexual gratification and fetishisation. Then, apparently, it’s ‘complicated’.… Read More

We never abolished our human zoos – they are digital now

Saartjiemania, Serena and The Politics of Black Humiliation by Otamere Guobadia It is nearly impossible to deny that we live in a gladiatorial zeitgeist. A world in which Jerry Springer and Jeremy Kyle’s shows mine working class sorrow for the satiation of eager and complicit audiences. A culture of humiliation. Humiliation of the disenfranchised plays… Read More

Brazil’s new primetime show “Sexo e as Negas” serves the white gaze

TV Channel Globo, one of the largest television networks in Brazil, is broadcasting a series called “Sexo e as Nega”. The series is an adaptation of Sex and the City, but this time with four Black actresses. The series has been written by the famous White actor, writer and producer Miguel Fallabella.

The very title of the series is itself hugely problematic, not only because race is the primary signifier of the women, but also because the terms are full of racist and gendered connotations, such as the venacular Brazilian expression “I’m not your niggaz “. In racist discourses, Black women are those who work for sex, while the white woman is the woman who is worthy of romantic love, kindness and respect. Read More

What’s R(ace) Got To Do With It?: White Privilege & (A)sexuality

by Alok Vaid-Menon  There is an absence of dialogue around asexuality and all of its associated critiques from many queer spaces I’ve been a part of. The first time I ever saw someone like me having sex was in a spam internet advertisement in India. “Hairy Mallu Boys.” And I may have followed the link.… Read More

Orgasms, Virginity and My Mad Fat Diary

 by Huma Munshi Trigger warning for one description of self-harm Madness is but a sleight of hand The line is so faint It is mere good fortune That today I write Today I accomplish Tomorrow I may crumble Into smithereens[1] Rae in My Mad Fat Diary has a new boyfriend and he is helping her… Read More

Hanif Kureishi: sex, race and identity

by Huma Munshi Hanif Kureishi, like many of the male protagonists in his novels and screenplays, comes across as slightly nervous and awkward. He deploys a healthy dose of dry wit while reading from his new book, The Last Word, in the Purcell Room at the Southbank, London. His success in giving voice to the… Read More