Exhibition of the Year: No Colour Bar: Black Art in Action 1960-1990

by Hamja Ahsan    There is an entire generation of us – of younger artists, aspiring art historians and curators of colour – who went to art school inspired by Rasheed Araeen’s attempts to readdress race equality and the imperialist legacy of British modern art institutions. We remained too young to visit landmark exhibitions like… Read More

Top 10 Causes in 2015 That Restored Faith in Humanity

by Rubab Zaidi It seems as though the last twelve months have brought one calamity after another – some caused by nature and some entirely manmade. It hasn’t all been gloom and doom though, because out of all the carnage and heartbreak there have emerged many acts of unity, heroism and genuine kindness. Like this… Read More

The Standout Screen Performances In 2015

CONTENT NOTE: This piece will contain spoilers for the programmes discussed. by Shane Thomas  A year ago, looking back on television that centred around people of colour, I highlighted Georgina Campbell’s staggering performance in Murdered By My Boyfriend. A performance that I confidently stated would receive no award recognition. Campbell went on to win a… Read More

Open Letter to the Financial Times: On Black Students Protesting Against Racism

We See Things Differently by Ahmed Olayinka Sule  Dear Edward, I write regarding your article, “The rise of liberal intolerance in America”, published in the Financial Times on 30 November 2015. The central theme of your paper was that the sensitivity of the liberal left in general and black agitators in particular is stifling free… Read More

No, Mrs Mugabe, I am not responsible for my rape.

By Anonymous TRIGGER WARNING: This piece contains descriptions of assault and discussions on rape, shaming and abuse. I was 22 and interning overseas at a big Inter-Governmental Organisation which employed a couple of hundred people. A flashy building, meeting VIPs, attending cocktail receptions – for me this was the equivalent of the bright lights of Hollywood.… Read More

Why science fiction matters to life in the postcolony

by Haris A. Durrani I remember learning about the Sykes-Picot Agreement of 1916, that moment when Britain and France drew lines on a map of what is now known as the Middle East. I was in high school in the U.S., and the so-called Arab Spring had just erupted on the other side of the… Read More

So Nadiya won the Great British Bake Off, why the big deal?

By Henna Zamurd-Butt  Surely in “melting pot Britain” no one should be batting an eyelid at Nadiya Hussain’s win of the Great British Bake Off? Well yeah. But clearly the pot’s not as melted as we’d have hoped because the media has been flipping out about it all week. The Mail even broke its three-year run… Read More

If Cookie Ruled the World

by Stephanie Phillips  Imagine if Cookie Lyon actually ran the music industry. Just imagine. Everything would be at least 50% more fabulous, leopard print fedoras would become the standard industry uniform and there would be no more Andy Coppings spouting their uneducated views on women in the music industry. Yes, if there were more Cookies… Read More

Israel’s ID card system is crushing Palestinian identity in Palestine and abroad

by Alia Al Ghussain  The past five weeks have seen repeated clashes break out in East Jerusalem. Israel’s ongoing oppression of Palestinians means clashes with Israeli police forces are nothing new in occupied Palestine. This time, Palestinians are out to protest Israel’s recently imposed limitations on access to Al Aqsa Mosque, the mosque in the Old City… Read More