Bombings, Bereavement and the Avoidance of Blame

Why does the West care when it does? by Nandini In 1992 Francis Fukuyama’s The End of History and the Last Man was published, in which he claimed that history had reached its endpoint with the demise of the Cold War: Western liberal democracy had won the Grand Final of ideological battles on the path… Read More

I’m a Muslim, and I Hold No Responsibility for the Actions of Daesh

by Abdullah Alhomoud  I’m a Muslim. I was born into a Sunni Muslim family in the Gulf region, the very same region where Wahhabism (the ideology of Daesh) originates. Yet I am still not Daesh. It should go without saying that the terrorist attacks committed against the people of France, Lebanon, Syria and Iraq are… Read More

Freedom of speech is a liberty that is not afforded uniformly within democracies

Charlie Hebdo on Aylan Kurdi: the ultimate act of white entitlement? by Guilaine Kinouani Few pictures have captured the suffering of Syrian refugees as poignantly as the photograph of Aylan Kurdi’s lifeless body lying face down and alone on the beach. This picture provided the inspiration for Charlie Hebdo’s most controversial cartoon of late. Captions… Read More

Why is the UK Home Office and Foreign Office distributing books in schools?

by Ananya Wilson-Bhattacharya A few weeks back, a three-year-old was placed in a government re-education programme, on suspicion of being an ‘extremist’. Though shocking, this story is very much in line with the current surveillance of young Muslims by the UK government under the draconian anti-terrorism laws and the so-called ‘Prevent Strategy’ which aims to… Read More

Ongoing terrorism in Nigeria is not novel, the use of children as human bombs is #WeAreAllNigeria

by Cristine Edusi On the 12th January, I returned to the UK having spent most of December and much of my new year in Nigeria. I boarded the plane and looked forward to perusing the on flight entertainment but before I could, the news about the 10-year-old “suicide bomber” in Borno appeared on my screen. According… Read More

“Hatred breeds hatred”: Charlie Hebdo, marginalisation and terrorism

by Guilaine Kinouani Many remember the place of their upbringing with fondness and nostalgia. This may be particularly so for those who through life’s circumstances, have had to leave their childhood home behind. As a Parisian born and cité bred immigrant to the UK, for me the banlieue of Paris evokes memories of multicultural community… Read More

#RacistVan, occupied media

‘This Week in Islamophobia’ by Yasin Bangee Fraser Nelson of the Spectator kicked off this week’s Islamophobia by publishing a fascist apologist piece: A fascist takeover of Greece? We should be so lucky. Despite many accounts of Golden Dawn’s racism, homophobia and sexism, Taki Theodoracopulos has the temerity to say, “No, Golden Dawn is not house-trained, and… Read More

Terror and I

by Roya Arab The first time I encountered terrorism was when I was very young. Holed up in our hotel in the 1970s, the Intercontinental by Hyde Park roundabout, we stared out of our suite onto the emptied wide street as a search was undertaken for the bomb. This was an IRA tactic; they would… Read More

Bomb disposal units and ministerial silence

  ‘This Week in Islamophobia‘ by Yasin Bangee With news of George Zimmerman’s acquittal, it was with *no* surprise that there’s been little reaction in the British press. Most newspapers resigned the story to a small footnote, and why not? Black news is not white news. Minority issues are not white issues. Another week has… Read More

Bomb attacks and creeping shariah…

‘This Week in Islamophobia’ by Yasin Bangee Ramadan  Ramadan has started and hundreds of thousands of Muslims around the UK are spending their day in contemplation, abstaining, where possible, from eating or drinking. The days are long, the heat oppressive but it’s a way of life. To accompany the start of Ramadan, the BBC aired… Read More