Chad’s Torture Factories: ‘Justice – not African justice’

by Karen Williams  Chad’s former leader, Hissène Habré, went on trial in Senegal this past July, accused of crimes against humanity, torture and war crimes committed during his rule. The trial comes after more than twenty years of long, hard struggle by survivors of Habré’s torture chambers and by the families of his victims. (The… Read More

Unrest

by Karen Williams With the prevalence of Islam-related news headlines, it is tempting to forget that the everyday still takes place in Muslim-majority areas: the going to school, the heartbreak, food and dance, and through the centuries, the constant production of art. This is the context shaping the work of groundbreaking South African photographers Husain… Read More

The Salvation Army campaign: black erasure and white dominance

by Huma Munshi  At first glance, the Salvation Army’s campaign to raise awareness of violence against women seems a bold move — turning on its head the dress that broke the internet and the often transparent marketing tricks that large advertising campaigns deploy. It sheds light on the horror of domestic violence. 1.2 million women in… Read More

Separate is not equal: A personal reflection on South Africa’s LGBTI movement

by Karen Williams The issue of gay rights in Africa has been gaining centre-stage, both on the continent and internationally. However, the longtime role and visibility of women and the urban poor in the fight for gay rights in South Africa has been wiped from official narratives, including the histories that are told within the… Read More

Walls of Whiteness

by Sara Ahmed It has been heartening to witness a heightened concern with race and higher education. An increase of concern helps to expose the lack of previous concern. But is it a welcome exposure. We have had articles in the mainstream media reflecting on the extraordinarily low numbers of black (especially black female) professors… Read More

A Public Life of Intimate Violence

Touched by Patsey’s struggles in the Oscar winning film ’12 Years a Slave’, Karen Williams describes how the film helped her to recognise and articulate the depths of latter day racism in her own ‘Public Life of Intimate Violence’  I have spent decades challenging women to have public lives, and for dark women to insist on their right to it, even with the abuse… Read More

Why Make a Caricature of what are Complex Feelings for Some Black Women?

by Leona Nichole Black A video has been circulating my Facebook news feed this week. It stages a scene in which a Black man brings his white girlfriend into a barber shop. A hairdresser who is a hired actress says a number of inappropriate things about the couple and the presence of this woman. The… Read More

Extraordinary Careers: A Maverick Filmmaker

by Jahmil X.T. Qubeka Either directly or cloaked, my work is a reflection of the universe that I inhabit. As an indigenous young African, I find myself confronted by a world in constant flux; it is so unrelenting that it can’t help but inform my chosen reality. Trying to swim in the sociopolitical tide that… Read More

Black Consciousness: an intersection of theory and praxis.

by Youlendree Appasamy In a South Africa where political machinations are the modus operandi and the political actors are simplified to greedy, corrupt individuals (often for good reason), it is difficult not to think of George Orwell’s political fairy tale: Animal Farm. In response to South Africa’s ambiguous, yet ominous political landscape and the 36th… Read More

‘Exotic’, ‘Tribal’, ‘Ethnic’ fashion?

by Samira Sawlani Walk into any store on the British high street and you are bound to see costume jewellery, artefacts and clothing which look as if they are made in Africa or branded as ‘ethnic’ or ‘tribal’ (the usage of both which are not only irritating but also problematic). Women will use these words… Read More