When will Theresa May Stop Shadow Boxing and Get Down to Business?

by Kiri Kankhwende  Yesterday’s Supreme Court judgement was the latest instalment in Britain’s inch towards Brexit, but if feels like the campaign is never-ending. Even as Leave campaign promises (£350 million for the NHS) and guarantees (staying in the single market) evaporate in thin air, Brexit needs an enemy to maintain momentum. And time and… Read More

Perhaps we really should go back to Africa

by Felipe Araujo  In Solange’s album A Seat at the Table, there is a song called “Where Do We Go”. Released in 2016, it is a poignant compilation of personal confessions and meditations on growing up black in America. “Where Do We Go”, sung in a whisper, talks about a home she no longer recognises… Read More

Remembering 2016 – a year of political progress and awakening

by Maurice Mcleod  Martin Luther King famously said, “The arc of moral universe is long but it bends towards justice” – meaning eventually the good will win. Last year it often felt like the arc was actually just a loop, a never-ending cycle of hope, disappointment and despair. But although it may seem as if the… Read More

In conversation with writer and activist Sharon Dodua Otoo

by Jendella Benson “Parenting is the single most important thing I do.” This statement is the third sentence in the biography of Berlin-based activist and award-winning writer Sharon Dodua Otoo and it leapt out at me. Somewhere deep down I feel similarly, but it would never occur to me to say this out loud, let… Read More

Cuts to Sexual Health services in the UK will disproportionately affect BAME communities

by Dr Rageshri Dhairyawan  2017 marks the 100th anniversary of the Venereal Diseases (VD) Act of 1917, a significant piece of legislation in the UK, which introduced the guiding principles of free and confidential treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) that are still followed today. This act led to the creation of the first purpose… Read More

Why Theresa May’s announcement on mental health isn’t good enough

by Cameron De Chi  Fuelled by a desire to achieve her vision of the “Shared Society,” Theresa May has promised what the BBC optimistically calls “mental health reform”, focusing specifically on young people and people in the workplace. This amounts to offering “mental health first aid training” to teachers, setting aside £15m for “community care”,… Read More

Longlist announced for inaugural Jhalak Prize book of the year

This week, the Jhalak Prize for Book of the Year by a Writer of Colour released its inaugural longlist. The new award, which seeks to celebrate books by British/British resident BAME writers, is due to announce a winner at Bare Lit Festival 2017. Read More

Top 10 WoC Athletes of 2016 (and possibly 2017)

by Christienna Fryar and Shireen Ahmed   2016 may have been one of the most taxing years in recent history with the loss of sporting and artistic greats, but it also showed tremendous sportsmanship and glory from female athletes. For all its problems, the Olympics have reliably become one of the best showcases of women’s sports and… Read More

Star Wars: Rogue One places Asian heroes at the core of its revolution

by Kelly Kanayama  Star Wars: Rogue One is a rare thing in mainstream media: a movie about revolution that actually tries to be revolutionary. Taking place right before the original Star Wars movie, Rogue One centres on a band of scrappy misfits who unite to save the galaxy from the evil Empire by stealing the blueprints for the Death… Read More