Stuart Hall and Black British photography | Part 1

by Jagdish Patel The death of Stuart Hall on the 10th February was marked by worldwide praise for ‘Britain’s leading cultural theorist’. (2014. Stuart Hall – obituary, Daily Telegraph, 10th February,) It is rare for an academic to receive accolades in the mainstream press, and this perhaps reflects how Hall presented his ideas, not only… Read More

Muscovado review: An alternative narrative that restores the humanity slaves were denied

by Ella Achola Matilda Ibini’s Muscovado, a BurntOut theatre production is set on the Fairbranch sugar plantation in 19th century Barbados where Miss Kitty struggles to keep her household together. Performed in the front of Holy Trinity Church in Clapham Common, the place where William Wilberforce first began his abolition campaign, Muscovado centres the slaves… Read More

Black Artists Centre Stage: An Interview with Everton Wright

by Jon Daniel In October, we in the UK celebrate Black History Month. The tradition started 27 years ago and provides a small, but well established window of opportunity to focus on the achievements of primarily African and African-Caribbean people in the UK. Befitting this historical date in the calendar, I wanted to take the… Read More

Black British feminism then and now

Professor Heidi Mirza reflects upon her involvement in black feminism and the changes she has witnessed over the past 30 years. She is hopeful about new generations of activists and reminds us that “black women’s activism has been central in tackling problems within our local communities.”   ‘Thank you for organising this. I thought black feminism was dead!’ wrote a young woman in an email to… Read More

It’s Time to Talk About Black Tudors

by  Rowena Mondiwa A criminally neglected part of British history is the true scope of the African diaspora in Britain that reaches as far back as Renaissance Europe. A new book by Onyeka Nubia seeks to rectify the problem, examining the lives of the thousands of blacks that lived in the UK in Tudor times.… Read More

Alexandre Dumas: An Original Writer of Colour

by Glen Chisholm A new generation of viewers are being introduced to the swashbuckling adventures of D’Artagnan and his friends and brothers in arms Athos, Porthos and Aramis. Many will know their motto, “All for one, One for all” as their adventures are played out in the BBC’s new Sunday night family drama series. The… Read More

#12YearsASlave Black women suffered uniquely during the slave trade

Content note for plot spoilers, and depictions of racist and misogynoirist violence:  by Shane Thomas It speaks volumes when a filmmaker has a distinctive tonality to their work after only three films. With Hunger and Shame, Steve McQueen has made movies of searing intensity. His latest, 12 Years a Slave is no different. It’s a… Read More

Photo Gallery: This Sportin’ Life

Black Olympic athletes in the 20th and early 21st centuries This article was researched and written by Bridget Lockyer, a graduate work-placement student in 2009 at the Social Science Collections and Research team at the British Library. Sport has the power to unite people in a way little else can. Sport can create hope where… Read More

“Black people don’t go to galleries” – The reproduction of taste and cultural value

by David Osa Amadasun Since childhood I have always been curious as to why rich people were rich and the poor were poor. Fast-forward two decades and that same curiosity has evolved into a call for action to do something about the insidious ways in which inequalities infect our daily lives. It was during the… Read More

The Black History of Rock

by Shane Thomas I have something of a beef with the MOBO (Music of Black Origin) Awards. It’s a common complaint during this time of year. However, my bugbear has nothing to do with the canard that the awards ceremony is racist. You can set your watch to the, “MOBO’s! Where’s the equality?! What about… Read More