‘Jihadi John’ media coverage: Worrying times for the “Average Mo”

by Mohamed Omar *’Jihadi John’ was allegedly killed in an airstrike 12/11/2015. The following critique still stands Finally, “Jihadi John” has been unmasked. He is Mohammed Emwazi, a Kuwaiti-born UK citizen. He was known to his teachers as a loner; a hard-working pupil who achieved the required grades to get into University. Mohammed performed relatively… Read More

Living in Black and White on Twitter: Why #AliveWhileBlack is Much More Important than #CrimingWhileWhite

by Queen Muse   Black people already know that white privilege exists. We know this because we observe it every day on our jobs, in our schools, and sometimes even while simply trying to get a good table at a restaurant. We also know that police brutality and discrimination are real issues that disproportionately affect… Read More

Ferguson and the Indictment of Social Media

by Iman Amrani In the early hours of the morning I was propped up on the sofa, in front of the news (the channel is irrelevant, they were all showing it), phone in hand, Twitter open on #Ferguson. This story has swept the world into a frenzy. Across different time zones people were glued to… Read More

How To Use Brown People To Illustrate A Story About Overpopulation

by Karl Sharro Yesterday a report was published by the National Academy of Sciences warning that even major wars and catastrophes won’t curb population growth. Good news, you might think, we are resilient as a species, but of course that’s not the version that the media will go with. Naturally it’s too good an opportunity… Read More

ISIS – We’re going to war, but are we breaking the law?

by Amanda Paul Parliament has just sanctioned airstrikes on Iraqi soil after Iraq’s Prime Minister Haider Al-Abadi requested military intervention by Britain a few days ago. The cause for such a grandiose request – ISIS. ISIS needs to be STOPPED. I’m concerned though by the means Britain believes it should use to achieve this. Airstrikes… Read More

Our History Is Richer Than Human Zoos and Enslavement

by Jesse Bernard I’m sure like myself, those of you who are against Exhibit B were happy to learn that further shows at the The Barbican Centre have been cancelled, as of Tuesday ‘after a huge, short sharp and a dynamic campaign‘. Unfortunately, the media coverage of the cancellation indicates that much work is still… Read More

Black Men Need To Support Black Feminism

by Jesse Bernard Being a black man over the past couple of weeks has been interesting, as it always is. I’ve stood in solidarity with the citizens of Ferguson, Missouri – both virtually and in a march at Notting Hill Carnival. There is a long history of black women leading movements for change and the… Read More

SketchFactor for the Middle East: Israel Is a ‘Good Country’ in a ‘Bad Neighbourhood’

by Zishad Lak This year we saw SketchFactor, an app which rates the ‘sketchiness’ of a neighbourhood to help individuals avoid ‘undesirable’ areas, reach the finals of New York’s Big Apps competition. Unsurprisingly, when we start to unpack what ‘sketchy’ actually means, the race implications become evident. The 47-second preview of Obama’s interview with the… Read More

How Law illustrates the non-war in Gaza

by Tanzil Chowdhury Even a vapid take on Israel-Palestine, void of allegiances or ideological commitments illustrates, at the very least, that to call it a ‘war’ is a misnomer. War suggests some sense of equality, not in claims and stakes, but in military might. A glance at the death tolls and the demographic of those… Read More

The Tragedy Of Otello: A layperson’s view of racial politics in 21st Century opera

 by Daniel York  The English National Opera have recently announced that the role of Otello in their upcoming production of Verdi’s opera of the same name, which is based on Shakespeare’s Othello, will be played by the renowned Australian tenor, Stuart Skelton. Othello is of course Shakespeare’s famous (and in many ways infamous) “black” character.… Read More