Creatives of colour are the Fela Kutis of our time

Media Diversified founder Samantha Asumadu on what feels like a burgeoning movement for black, brown and Asian theatre makers. There are a few perks to being the founder of Media Diversified and this week that perk was getting to see Barry Jenkins’ feature film If Beale Street Could Talk. It is in effect one of… Read More

‘This is an industry rife with cronyism, nepotism, racism and sexism’ writes Kolton Lee, calling for change in British film

Many in the ‘creative economies’ discuss ‘diversity’ in such an abstract and intellectual way that it de-politicises real and everyday injustice, writes filmmaker and academic Kolton Lee  Read More

Daughters of the Dust: Inspiring black story telling for a generation

By Precious Agbabiaka I remember just over a year ago being completely captivated by Beyoncé’s visual album Lemonade. The scenes belonging to the chapters “Hope” and “Redemption” from the hour long masterpiece brought me so much joy and renewed sense of pride as I bore witness to black girls and women, including some familiar faces,… Read More

A Moving Image: telling the story of gentrification in Brixton

by Shane Thomas Content note: this review contains minor spoilers I’ve always found watching a movie, especially in the cinema, to be an act of psychological – albeit synthetic – transport. Being taken to a space different than the one I inhabit, engaging with new people, perspectives, and locations that I would never otherwise encounter. However,… Read More

Get Out: If I’m around too many white people, I get nervous

By Maurice Mcleod  (spoilers only in the links) Good horror, just like good satire, isn’t built around the bizarre, it’s built on the familiar. There are few things more familiar to black people in the West than being the outsider in social or professional circles. Answering dumb-ass questions about your heritage or sporting prowess are just… Read More

Hollywood’s Awards Season Fascination with Rape and Sexual Abuse

by Winnie M Li  Content warning: includes references to rape and sexual abuse A few months ago at the Golden Globes, Isabelle Huppert won a Golden Globe for playing a rape survivor, and Aaron Taylor-Johnson won for playing a rapist-murderer. While subsequent awards shows haven’t panned out the same way, both actors continue to be lauded… Read More

Moonlight isn’t just a part of the conversation for film of the year, it is the conversation

by Shane Thomas Content note: this review contains spoilers It’s often said that a key facet of healthy relationships is open, honest, and clear communication. Perhaps less emphasised is that this applies to familial relationships as well as romantic ones. Eight years after his debut feature film, Medicine for Melancholy, Barry Jenkins has made a movie… Read More

The unbearable whiteness of history

by Jendella Benson  Deciding that it is never too early to take the task of cultural reproduction seriously (see David Osa Amadasun’s article, “‘Black people don’t go to galleries’ – The reproduction of taste and cultural values”), I took my fourteen month old son to the National Portrait Gallery one brisk November afternoon. The exhibition… Read More

Star Wars: Rogue One places Asian heroes at the core of its revolution

by Kelly Kanayama  Star Wars: Rogue One is a rare thing in mainstream media: a movie about revolution that actually tries to be revolutionary. Taking place right before the original Star Wars movie, Rogue One centres on a band of scrappy misfits who unite to save the galaxy from the evil Empire by stealing the blueprints for the Death… Read More