Separate is not equal: A personal reflection on South Africa’s LGBTI movement

by Karen Williams The issue of gay rights in Africa has been gaining centre-stage, both on the continent and internationally. However, the longtime role and visibility of women and the urban poor in the fight for gay rights in South Africa has been wiped from official narratives, including the histories that are told within the… Read More

Visual Subversions: At the Intersection of Art and Identity

Stunning traditional henna designs on hands, backs and legs are the subject of artist Hina Ali‘s photo essay, exploring skin as a ‘repository of honour & canvass of oppression’. with Rakshi Rath The Artist’s Journey: I am a final year undergraduate, studying Fine Art for Design. My search for mediums of artistic expression during my studies has also coincided… Read More

Fathering While Black Part 2 – On a Path of Forgiveness

by Zun Lee Read Part 1 of Fathering While Black Father absence was a personal double-whammy for me: I grew up with a Korean father who was married to my mother, lived at home with us, provided materially but was emotionally distant, and extremely physically abusive. From a census perspective, he’d be considered “present”, yet… Read More

Fathering While Black

Part 1 – Reimagining the Singularity of Media Representations of Black Fatherhood by Zun Lee Black fathers continue to be profiled in the media, and not just by the usual suspects. Why a broader perspective on representations of Black fatherhood remains largely outside of the public realm and what role visual storytelling could play to… Read More

“but everybody on TV is white and all the nice people are blonde.”

by Hana Riaz Earlier this summer, my beautiful then five-year-old Nepali nieces sat with me in our garden enjoying the warm and easy sun. What started as a conversation about what happens to melanin when it finds home in all that glorious vitamin d, looking at our skin browner than it’s winter shade, turned into… Read More

Photo Gallery: Taiwan, through the Lens of the People

I visited Taiwan for the first time 5 years ago with my wife, who’s Taiwanese; at that time, I knew next to nothing about the country’s history and people. This has made observing and photographing life here all the more interesting to me. It is also a clear signifier to me that in the West we… Read More

Re-routing Remembrance

by Nirmal Puwar & Sanjay Sharma with Kuldip Powar   Scene One: 6th November 2002, Commonwealth Memorial Gates, London. The Queen inaugurates the Memorial Gates, Constitution Hill, Hyde Park. The main inscription of the Memorial reads ‘In memory of the five million volunteers from the Indian sub-continent, Africa and the Caribbean who fought with Britain… Read More

Photo Gallery: This Sportin’ Life

Black Olympic athletes in the 20th and early 21st centuries This article was researched and written by Bridget Lockyer, a graduate work-placement student in 2009 at the Social Science Collections and Research team at the British Library. Sport has the power to unite people in a way little else can. Sport can create hope where… Read More

“Black people don’t go to galleries” – The reproduction of taste and cultural value

by David Osa Amadasun Since childhood I have always been curious as to why rich people were rich and the poor were poor. Fast-forward two decades and that same curiosity has evolved into a call for action to do something about the insidious ways in which inequalities infect our daily lives. It was during the… Read More

Photo Gallery: Black Actors on Stage and Screen

Vintage images from stage, film, vaudeville, radio, and early television Kicha‘s images represent vintage snapshots into the lives of African Americans. The good, the bad and the ugly. “Even today the motion picture has not quite outgrown its immaturity. It still uses talented Negro players to fit into the ~d stereotypes of the loving Mammy… Read More