Halloween, Racism’s Biggest Party

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You’re not to know this about me, but I hate Halloween. I always have done. Even when I participated in ‘trick or treat’ on a couple of occasions when I was a child, I was secretly wishing I was back home controlling the adventures of Super Mario on my old NES.

But my problems with Halloween go beyond any individual dislike of crowds of people and dressing up. While many look forward to this time of year – some of my friends among them – this is often a frustrating and enraging time for people of colour.

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The Colourblind Doctrine

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A new ideology has reared its head in our “post racial” century and we have labelled it colour blind. The doctrine rests on the idea that we no longer see colour, just people. We no longer “see” race but may choose to characterise a person by their gender, perhaps even the colour of their hair or eyes but never race. The doctrine’s appeal is that it supposedly counteracts racism. I would contest that opinion. If colourblindness developed out of the desire to be more politically correct then I would say we have in fact become the complete opposite. If colour blindness developed out of a desire to suppress racism then I would say it does nothing but fuel it.

Brazil’s new primetime show “Sexo e as Negas” serves the white gaze

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TV Channel Globo, one of the largest television networks in Brazil, is broadcasting a series called “Sexo e as Nega”. The series is an adaptation of Sex and the City, but this time with four Black actresses. The series has been written by the famous White actor, writer and producer Miguel Fallabella.

The very title of the series is itself hugely problematic, not only because race is the primary signifier of the women, but also because the terms are full of racist and gendered connotations, such as the venacular Brazilian expression “I’m not your niggaz “. In racist discourses, Black women are those who work for sex, while the white woman is the woman who is worthy of romantic love, kindness and respect.

Race, Revenue and Representation

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While the statistics may suggest otherwise, my own personal experience is that the creative industry has always been a relatively level playing field – where ‘race’ is overtaken by ‘revenue’ every time. If you have the creative talent and commercially exploitable skills, then colour doesn’t come into it.

However, the problem is getting your foot in the door to showcase your skills in the first place. In a world where ‘who you know’ can make a world of difference, that’s not so easy if you don’t know anyone in the industry. And this is where the issue of ‘under-representation’ is a major problem.

This Week In Whitesplaining

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It is easy to wonder why those who are not white cannot connect as readily with white characters if it is your identity that has systematically monopolised standard templates for fiction and more: White, the go-to-guy. Perhaps this was Mathew Klickstein’s problem when his interview with Flavorwire took a turn for the absolute worst. Promoting Night of Nickelodeon Nostalgic Nonsense! for which he was event moderator, the resentment for a pitiful handful of TV characters who were not white, took grip and dominated a horrendous read. “That show is awkward,” he said of Sanjay and Craig, “because there’s actually no reason for that character to be Indian.”

More Than Melanin: A Film Series on Black Experiences

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While schools may mark Black History Month, it is important to remember that we cannot rely on them to teach us about black history.

There are other avenues, resources and people that can provide us with an abundance of knowledge, particularly during this month.

One example is Filmmaker and founder of Visionnary Arts, Troy James Aidoo who to mark Black History Month has created a short film series titled More Than Melanin.

Judy Finnigan: the myth of the perfect victim and the acceptable rape

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In one fail sweep Judy Finnigan has laid bare the prejudice and ignorance faced by rape survivors. Speaking on ITV’s Loose Women programme on the case of convicted rapist, Ched Evans, Judy noted that because there wasn’t violence during the rape and the woman was drunk at the time, it didn’t cause “bodily harm.” Therefore, the footballer having served his sentence should be allowed to return to play in his team, Sheffield United.

Tourism, White Privilege and Colonial Mentality in East Africa

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Two weeks ago the media reported that the Kenyan Government have offered a free holiday to the family of a 15 year old American tourist who was ‘harassed by a police officer’ because he mistook her for terror suspect Samantha Lewthwaite. If it was a Somali family holidaying in Kenya and their son had been mistaken for Abu Ubaidah the new leader of Al-Shabaab would the same courtesy have been offered? I highly doubt it.
The concept of white privilege is associated with predominantly white societies such as the United States of America and Great Britain

Ain’t no black in the UKIP pack?

Ain’t no black in the UKIP pack?

Now we know for sure. After their stunning, and literally historic victory in the Clacton by-election and unexpected success in the North West on the same day, there is now electoral ‘proof’ – if any were still needed – that UKIP are likely to have a significant impact on the outcome of the general election in May 2015.

So what does this mean for minority ethnic communities in Britain, as the political centre of gravity drifts to the right?

“There is no racism in football… If you are good, you get the job”

Rooney Rules ok!

Much talk has centred around the NFL’s, “Rooney Rule” as a panacea, which ensures that at least one person of colour must be interviewed when a head coaching position becomes available. It’s said that such a measure could offset the paucity of managers of colour in English football.
More recently, Sir Trevor Brooking, the former Director of Football Development at the FA said he was against such a regulation, offering choice quotes such as, “Some black coaches say they’re not given a chance, but I do think a lot of them have to get themselves in that position”, and, “There is a reluctance from people sometimes and they feel it should be handed to them.”